Tag Archives: Nelson Mandela

Mandela’s will leaves money for family and staff but nothing for Winnie

4 Feb

mandela1_2603614b (2) So rang the headlines of various newspapers around the world in response to the public disclosure of Nelson Mandela’s will.

The question is should he have included his ex-wife Winnie at all in his will?

We’ve heard arguments from both sides of the aisle, some readers feel she helped build the Mandela brand and is therefore entitled to something but others point out that ex-wives are rarely ever beneficiaries of ex-husbands’ wills.
We’re holding our thoughts on this one and opening it up for wider discussion. For those needing to get up to speed, here’s a quick summary of Mandela’s will.*

The estate was valued at 46 million Rand (excluding royalties) with Justice Moseneke, Judge President of the Eastern Cape Themba Sangoni and prominent human rights lawyer George Bizos named as executors.

Moseneke, summarising what he said was a 40-page document said the will was put together on 12 October 2004 with final amendments made in 2008.

The will provided bequests to his children and grandchildren from each of his three wives, Ms. Graca Machel and former wives, Mrs. Winnie Madikizela Mandela and Mrs. Evelyn Mandela who passed away in 2004. President Mandela and Ms. Graca Machel were married in community of property and therefore she is entitled to half of his estate. According to Moseneke, although Ms. Graca Machel has 90 days to contest the will, she agreed to waive all claim to Mandela’s estate. The mood of Mandela family when the will was read privately, prior to the press conference, was described by Moseneke as “charged with emotions but it went well and… there were clarifications sought from time to time.”

Bequests of 50,000 Rand were made to various staff members including Zelda Le Grange, Mandela’s long time former private secretary. Mandela bequeathed 1,5 million Rand to the Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela Family Trust and left royalties to the trust of which a percentage (10% minimum and 30% maximum) would be given to the African National Congress. Moseneke noted that the 46 million Rand valuation of Mandela’s estate was subject to final verification and excluded royalties.

Mandela donated 100,000 Rand for scholarships to four educational institutions which he attended; Clarke Institution in Transkei, Hilltown Institution, University of Fort Hare and University of the Witwatersrand. He also donated 100,000 Rand to Qunu Secondary School in his childhood hometown and Orlando West High School in Soweto where he once lived.


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*Forbes

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His courage will live on

6 Dec

Mandela fist

A Tribute by Sani Dowa

When I heard the news of Nelson Mandela’s passing this morning, I was struck by how personal it felt. I was reminded of a childhood in Zimbabwe (then Rhodesia); of being at the receiving end of a racially segregated society; and following Nelson Mandela’s story with hope and fascination.

In African culture death is always accompanied by much sadness and mourning not just by the immediate family but by the wider community. Yet this morning, the tears that filled my eyes were of pride; not sadness. The lump in my throat was not anxiety but rather an overwhelming sense of being in a moment that will define my own life in ways I cannot yet comprehend.

As my Facebook page lit up with tributes from all corners of the world I could sense a collective gratitude to this truly inspirational son of Africa. There was a sense of awe from many of my generation who experienced and benefitted from the shattering of racial oppression. We’re keenly aware that our freedom came at the cost of leaders like Mandela who gave up so much yet never complained or saw it that way themselves.

In this moment I’m reminded of Nelson Mandela’s words: “I was not a messiah, but an ordinary man who became a leader because of extraordinary circumstances”. I ask myself what I, as an ordinary African, can do to help change the world for future generations of African children. That’s the legacy Nelson Mandela leaves for us…he made us all want to reach within and find our best selves.

Hamba kahle Madiba! Go in peace Madiba!

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This article first appeared in Plan Australia’s blog http://www.plan.org.au

Quote of the week – Death is something inevitable

6 Dec

NM

‘Death is something inevitable. When a man has done what he considers to be his duty to his people and his country, he can rest in peace. I believe I have made that effort and that is, therefore, why I will sleep for eternity.’

Nelson Mandela  

Stop the rape of our children – sign the petition!

21 Jul

Nigeria
On Tuesday 16 July 2013, the Nigerian Federal Senate approved the marriage of under-aged children in the country. We at Every African Women are outraged that once again girls’ rights are being openly violated under the guise of culture and religion.

The new law sets aside the constitutional requirement that a child must be at least 18 years old to enter into an agreement of marriage. Supporters of the under-age law include Senator Yerima Ahmad Sani who himself recently married a 13-year-old Egyptian girl. In justifying his actions he stated that the constitutional stipulation of a minimum age was at variance with Islamic law. How convenient then that the Senate’s actions have now legalised his actions!

Sign our petition to the Nigerian National Assembly demanding that they stop the legalisation of child marriage. Pass it on to everyone you know, man or woman, and stop the legal rape of our children and little sisters!

SIGN THE PETITION NOW

I have walked that long walk to freedom

19 Jul

mandela fist
Anyone who reads this blog regularly knows how much we love an inspirational quote! There’s nothing like a lifetime of experience and wisdom, captured in a few words and gently sprinkled across the sands, to uplift all who walk by.

So this week on the occasion of Nelson Mandela’s 95th birthday, we took the time to reflect on one of our favourite Africans’ most inspiring words. Here are our top 10 and we hope you’ll love them as much as we do!

1.‘I have walked that long walk to freedom. I have tried not to falter; I have made missteps along the way. But I have discovered the secret that after climbing a great hill, one only finds that there are more hills to climb. I have taken a moment here to rest, to steal a view of the glorious vista that surrounds me, to look back on the distance I have come. But I can rest only for a moment, for with freedom come responsibilities and I dare not linger, for my long walk is not ended.’

2.‘No one is born hating another person because of the colour of his skin, or his background, or his religion. People must learn to hate, and if they can learn to hate, they can be taught to love, for love comes more naturally to the heart than its opposite.’

3.‘I dream of an Africa that is in peace with itself. I dream of the realisation of unity in Africa whereby its leaders, some of whom are highly competent and experienced, can unite in their efforts to improve and to solve the problems of Africa.’

4.‘I learned that courage was not the absence of fear, but the triumph over it. The brave man is not he who does not feel afraid, but he who conquers that fear.’

5.‘If you talk to a man in a language he understands, that goes to his head. If you talk to him in his language, that goes to his heart.’

6.‘There is nothing like returning to a place that remains unchanged to find the ways in which you yourself have altered.’

7.‘Only free men can negotiate; prisoners cannot enter into contracts. Your freedom and mine cannot be separated.’

8.‘I am fundamentally an optimist. Whether that comes from nature or nurture, I cannot say. Part of being an optimist is keeping one’s head pointed toward the sun, one’s feet moving forward. There were many dark moments when my faith in humanity was sorely tested, but I would not and could not give myself up to despair. That way lay defeat and death.’

9.‘It is better to lead from behind and put others in front, especially when you celebrate victory when nice things occur. You take the front line when there is danger. Then people will appreciate your leadership.’

10.‘I was not a messiah, but an ordinary man who had become a leader because of extraordinary circumstances.’